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"This is where it all begins. Everything starts here, today."

- David Nichols -

Areas of Treatment

Therapitas provides treatment for communication disorders that arise out of:

  • Developmental Delays
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Hearing Loss
  • Learning Delays
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Down Syndrome
  • Prematurity
  • Failure to Thrive
  • other conditions

We provide specific treatment plans for:

  • Apraxia
  • Fluency
  • Specific Language Impairment
  • Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Language Delay
  • Articulation Disorders
  • Expressive Language Disorder
  • Receptive Language Disorder
  • Dysphagia (Feeding Swallowing)
  • Voice Disorders
  • Pragmatics (Social Skills)
  • Cognitive communication disorders

We work with children and focus on equipping them with the strategies that maximize their potential for independence. Therapitas offers Speech and Language Therapy along with Occupational Therapy to Medicaid recipients and private pay patients.

What is Speech Therapy?

Speech Therapy (also known as Speech-Language Pathology) is a branch of the medical community that treats communication and swallowing disorders. Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) hold master’s degrees or doctorates  with specific emphasis on communication disorders.

How Common are Communication Disorders?

Communication disorders are extremely common. In fact, The National Institute of Health estimates that between 8 and 9 percent of young children have a speech sound disorder. Most of these disorders can be significantly improved through treatment by a licensed SLP.

 

Should I Just Wait and See if my Child Grows Out of It?

Research has clearly shown that the earlier a child is treated by a Speech Therapist the better their chances of significant improvement. If your child’s issue is truly a communication disorder it will likely not improve on its own. Waiting to begin Speech Therapy can have a significant negative impact on a child’s communication skills and their educational performance.

What is Occupational Therapy?

Occupational Therapy (OT)  works to develop or recover daily living skills of patients suffering from physical or cognitive disorders. Occupational Therapists (OTRs) generally hold master’s degrees or doctorates  in Occupational Therapy from accredited programs. Since a child’s occupation includes playing, OTRs commonly work with children suffering from fine motor, gross motor, social, or cognitive impairments that prevent them from participating in typical childhood activities.

What are Some Common Issues an Occupational Therapist addresses?

Many children struggling in activities of daily living such as dressing, bathing, or feeding and swallowing or potty training. Other’s may struggle with specific fine motor issues such as hand writing. Gross motor issues such as running or jumping along with behavioral issues may also be treated by an Occupational Therapist.

How can I tell if my Child Needs Occupational Therapy?

If your child is having difficulty interacting with their peers or you have noticed that they do not seem to be developing at the same pace as other children, you may want to visit with an OTR. While many children develop at their own pace, many issues will not simply go away with time. An OTR will identify your child’s needs and work on them in a safe structured environment along with giving you the information you need to continue therapy at home.

What is Physical Therapy?

Occupational Therapy (OT)  works to develop or recover daily living skills of patients suffering from physical or cognitive disorders. Occupational Therapists (OTRs) generally hold master’s degrees or doctorates  in Occupational Therapy from accredited programs. Since a child’s occupation includes playing, OTRs commonly work with children suffering from fine motor, gross motor, social, or cognitive impairments that prevent them from participating in typical childhood activities.

What are Some Common Issues an Occupational Therapist addresses?

Many children struggling in activities of daily living such as dressing, bathing, or feeding and swallowing or potty training. Other’s may struggle with specific fine motor issues such as hand writing. Gross motor issues such as running or jumping along with behavioral issues may also be treated by an Occupational Therapist.

How can I tell if my Child Needs Occupational Therapy?

If your child is having difficulty interacting with their peers or you have noticed that they do not seem to be developing at the same pace as other children, you may want to visit with an OTR. While many children develop at their own pace, many issues will not simply go away with time. An OTR will identify your child’s needs and work on them in a safe structured environment along with giving you the information you need to continue therapy at home.